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IU continues to look at European Debt Crisis and its ties to the US

September 26, 2011

Olli Rehn, the European Commissioner for Economic and Monetary Affairs, spoke in Washington on Thursday (you can listen to his speech here).  His main point was that the EU must stabilize Greece and it is not going to abandon Greece in its moment of need, as the costs to Greece and Europe.  Mr. Rehn’s visit to Washington has also made the European Debt Crisis more visible in the US, as it received substantial attention on NPR’s Morning Edition Friday.  In fact, the euro has now become so newsworthy that Stephen Colbert even had a pretty decent interview on the subject. In one NPR story, the reporter looks at what would be the effects of Greek default on Greek citizens, Europe, and Germany, basically seconding what this blog has stated in the past (for example, see What if Greece Reintroduces the Drachma?).  In fact, the euro has now become so newsworthy that Stephen Colbert even had a pretty decent interview on the subject.

In addition, reporters are now focusing on what the European Debt Crisis means for the US, as NPR also reported on US Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner’s visit to Europe last week.  Basically, the two major concerns are that the European crisis could hurt US banks who have invested in European markets and international trade between the two largest economies (again, much of this information can also be found at How exposed is the US and Indiana to Greece?).

In order  to help people understand the theoretical underpinnings of the European Debt Crisis and how it affect the US, the EU Center is pleased to be offering two upcoming events:

Both events are free and open to the public, and for more information, please visit the EU Center website (www.iub.edu/~eucenter).

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